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Witch ward-off? Archaeology find from national geographic

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Oct. 29th, 2009 | 08:31 pm
posted by: lucy_chronicles in druidry

http://feeds.nationalgeographic.com/click.phdo?i=6b9276be3de00d7d56ff50050a29c51e

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/rss/article_id.pl?id=57403373
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In time for Halloween, archaeologists have unearthed a witch bottle—a stone jug that may have contained toenails, hair, and other bodily bits to deter witches and other evildoers.
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how do they know it was a 'witch' and why is it 'evil' instead of a shaman, doctors or other healers? geesh...


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Comments {10}

trip_tych

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from: trip_tych
date: Oct. 30th, 2009 03:47 pm (UTC)
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Ok, Western Europe.

The 17th century was when they began better understanding human anatomy, the way blood circulates through the body, experimenting with vitamins, and discovered that meat does not spontaneously generate flies. Granted, they still used leeches, relied on the ideas of the 4 humours and other really useless ideas but I disagree that witch bottles were the best medicine at the time.

Either way, there are plenty of good reasons for people to link such bottles with warding off the evil of witches.

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Pirate Jenny

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from: piratejenny
date: Oct. 31st, 2009 07:20 pm (UTC)
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Witch bottles weren't used as medicine though. They were used to avert supposed spells and such--though I suppose if someone thought they or their cattle were sick because of a witch it would count as such. I admit to not having read the article yet, but I've read a bit about witch bottles and other supposed cures to being cursed.

I was talking about medicine in general--I knew that schools started dissecting sometime around this but I didn't remember if it was further into the 18th century.

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